June 14, 2006

News You Might Have Missed * Vol. 5, No. 24

Important but underreported news from around the world.

QUOTED: “Nobody is safe, either onshore or offshore.”

— An anonymous security official on the massively increased ambition and capacity of petro-rebels targeting oil production around the delta of the Niger River (story #15, below).


TOP STORIES
[o1] “Mexico pressed to respond to pesticide deaths”
[o2] “Madrassas set up trusts in face of investigations into income”
[o3] “CIA Nazi Files Released”
 
ENVIRONMENT
[o4] “Scientists seek causes of stress for fish dying in Va., W.Va.”
[o5] “Outrage over infill in suburban areas”
[o6] “How melting glaciers alter Earth, spur quakes, volcanoes”
 
HEALTH
[o7] “Chemical firms ‘using workers as guinea pigs'”
[o8] “Out of sight and out of control”
[o9] “Carcinogen discovered in soft drinks”
[10] “Makerere Scientists Okay DDT”
 
THE WORLD CUP
[11] “World Cup ban in Mogadishu denied”
[12] “Rubbing Out Racism”
[13] “Green Goals for World Cup Nets”
 
WORLD
[14] “Long Distance Revolutionary”
[15] “ANALYSIS: Nigeria’s oil delta faces escalation of violence”
[16] “Sudan: Govt Agrees to Arrest Kony — ICC”
[17] “A Village in Yemen: A Day in the Life of a Failing State”
 
VIEWPOINT
[18] “Young people’s protests are easy to mock. But ignore them at your peril”
 


TOP STORIES | top

[o1]

“Mexico pressed to respond to pesticide deaths”
Indian Country Today, June 12, 2006

Chemicals banned in the U.S. are causing birth defects among Mexico’s Yaqui Indians, including “jelly babies” with no bones.

[o2]

“Madrassas set up trusts in face of investigations into their income sources”
Pakistan Daily Times, June 13, 2006

Some of the 14,000 religious schools in Pakistan get big grants from overseas sources, and seek to sidestep new regulations.

[o3]

“CIA Nazi Files Released”
Federation of American Scientists, June 7, 2006

A declassification project has released 27,000 pages detailing CIA relationships with former Nazis after WWII..


ENVIRONMENT | top

[o4]

“Scientists seek causes of stress for fish dying in Va., W.Va.”
Associated Press, June 13, 2006

Dead fish are turning up in Shenandoah National Park, bearing lesions the size of cigar burns.

[o5]

“Outrage over infill in suburban areas”
Baltimore Sun, June 10, 2006

Maryland’s “Smart Growth” policy is supposed to fight sprawl and preserve rural areas. But suburban green zones are now vanishing.

[o6]

“How Melting Glaciers Alter Earth’s Surface, Spur Quakes, Volcanoes”
Wall Street Journal, June 9, 2006

Periods of prehistoric warming have been linked with concurrent surges in vulcanism and earthquakes far from fault lines.


HEALTH | top

[o7]

“Chemical firms ‘using workers as guinea pigs'”
“5,000 cancer cases a year due to workplace: report”
Australian Broadcasting Corporation, June 13, 2006

Unions in Australia are furious, as new research finds 30 percent of worker lung cancer cases are caused by factory fumes.

[o8]

“Out of sight and out of control”
Sydney Morning Herald, June 10, 2006

No country requires safety testing of nanoparticles, which have shown toxicity in labs, and are increasingly used in cosmetics.

[o9]

“Carcinogen discovered in soft drinks”
Toronto Globe & Mail, June 10, 2006

Benzene turned up in 20 percent of soft drinks in Canada. Some Kool Aid brands had as much as four times the legal limit.

[10]

“Makerere Scientists Okay DDT”
The Monitor (Uganda), June 12, 2006

A Ugandan study finds no “perilous” effects from indoor DDT spraying intended to control malarial mosquitos.


THE WORLD CUP | top

[11]

“World Cup ban in Mogadishu denied”
BBC, June 13, 2006

Islamists in Somalia were criticized by furious citizens who said militant patrols were shutting down public soccer screenings..

[12]

“Rubbing Out Racism”
Christian Science Monitor, June 6, 2006

A German sociologist spends much of his time at soccer matches up in the stands, trying to keep racist fans in check.

[13]

“Green Goals for World Cup Nets”
Inter Press Service, June 7, 2006

Conservationists say World Cup eco-impacts will be greater than projected, and remedial measures are not adequate.


WORLD | top

[14]

“Uzbek exile strives to foment protest movement in Tashkent”
EurasiaNet, June 1, 2006

From his new home in Missouri, Bokhodir Choriyev is lobbying Congress, plying media and threatening hunger strikes.

[15]

“ANALYSIS: Nigeria’s oil delta faces escalation of violence”
Reuters, June 5, 2006

“800,000 barrels of oil per day offline in Nigeria”
Associated Press, June 9, 2006

Nigeria’s petro-rebels have massively increased their reach and sophistication in the past year, deeply impacting oil interests.

[16]

“Sudan: Govt Agrees to Arrest Kony — ICC”
The Monitor (Uganda), June 12, 2006

The leader of Uganda’s bloodthirsty Lord’s Resistance Army has asked the International Criminal Court to drop all charges.

[17]

“A Village in Yemen: A Day in the Life of a Failing State”
World Press Review, June 9, 2006

A lack of doctors and infrastructure, cronyism and intertribal hostilities take a painful toll on Yemen’s mostly rural populace.


VIEWPOINT | top

[18]

“Young people’s protests are easy to mock. But ignore them at your peril”
The Guardian (U.K.), June 12, 2006

Compared to the upheavals of 1968, today’s youth protesters are “younger, poorer and darker.”


Editor: Josh Wilson. Intern: David Agrell

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