November 15, 2006

News You Might Have Missed * Vol. 5, No. 46

Important but underreported news from around the world.

QUOTED: “On three occasions I have been diagnosed with lumps in my chest, which doctors say are due to lead poisoning … but no one has ever given me any money to do something else.”

— Christine Mupika, a resident of Kabwe, Zambia, who digs through lead-laced soil for coal to sell in Africa’s most polluted city (story #14, below).


TOP STORIES
[o1] “Air marshal’s firing prompts whistleblower suit”
[o2] “Not knowing what lies beneath”
[o3] “Investigation finds votes cast by people listed as dead”


WORLD
[o4] “1,500 Baathists killed in south”
[o5] “Analysts outraged over U.S. adjustments of employment data”
[o6] “Howard to defy U.S. on nuclear plant”


TOXIC WASTE
[o7] “British firm faces 100m-pound claim for ‘dumping toxic waste'”
[o8] “Trade pact with Japan ‘will turn country into a toxic waste dumpsite'”


WAL-MART
[o9] “Wal-Mart foes file suit against city”
[10] “Wal-Mart fights grocery ruling”


INDUSTRY & ENVIRONMENT
[11] “New ethanol plants spark concerns of ‘factory farm'”
[12] “India’s ship-breaking industry under scrutiny”
[13] “Dilovasi, symbol of savage industrialization”
[14] “Kabwe in Zambia, Africa’s most toxic city”


TOP STORIES | top

[o1]

“Air marshal’s firing prompts whistleblower suit”
Federal Times, November 7, 2006

An Air Marshal who exposed lax airplane security was the first government official fired for disclosing sensitive, but not classified, information.

[o2]

“Not knowing what lies beneath”
Houston Chronicle, November 12, 2006

Pipelines transporting gas, oil and hazardous chemicals are misplaced on federal maps and often run under homes in low-income neighborhoods.

[o3]

“Investigation finds votes cast by people listed as dead”
NewsNet5 (OH), November 3, 2006

“State will review voter roll”
Providence Journal, November 10, 2006

Thousands of dead people remain on the voter rolls in Rhode Island. In Ohio, more than two dozen had ballots cast in their names on Election Day when someone apparently forged their signatures.


WORLD | top

[o4]

“1,500 Baathists killed in south”
Azzaman (Iraq), November 8, 2006

Southern Iraqi militias have taken “de-Baathification” into their own hands with killing squads and lawlessness some blame the U.S. for provoking.

[o5]

“Analysts outraged over U.S. adjustments of employment data”
Globe and Mail (Canada), November 7, 2006

Canadian experts call recent monthly U.S. payrolls data showing inflated job growth “nonsense” because the numbers are revised so often.

[o6]

“Howard to defy U.S. on nuclear plant”
The Australian, November 11, 2006

Vermont health officials lost a court case to prevent a paper mill from running a test burn of tires for fuel, in spite of the particles it will produce.


TOXIC WASTE | top

[o7]

“British firm faces 100m-pound claim for ‘dumping toxic waste'”
Times (U.K.), November 10, 2006

Multinational firm Trafigura is accused of dumping 400 tons of toxic into the waterways of Abidjan, killing 10 people and injuring thousands.

[o8]

“Trade pact with Japan ‘will turn country into a toxic waste dumpsite'”
ADN Kronos (Italy), November 10, 2006

Philippine officials warn that a trade accord with Japan will allow the country to dump chemicals, pharmaceutical waste and sewage on their lands.


WAL-MART | top

[o9]

“Wal-Mart foes file suit against city”
Whittier Daily News (CA), November 11, 2006

Two groups fighting a new Wal-Mart in Rosemead, CA, have filed several suits alleging the city illegally granted the retailer permits.

10]

“Wal-Mart fights grocery ruling”
Long Beach Press-Telegram, November 1, 2006

Wal-Mart has formed a coalition to fight a Long Beach ordinance banning chain stores that sell groceries, a rule meant to benefit local grocers.


INDUSTRY & ENVIRONMENT | top

[11]

“New ethanol plants spark concerns of ‘factory farm'”
Muskegon Chronicle (MI), November 9, 2006

Ethanol plants drive the construction of nearby factory farms that spread raw manure on cornfields, creating unregulated pollution runoff

[12]

“India’s ship-breaking industry under scrutiny”
McClatchy, November 8, 2006

Indian workers are eager to dismantle an asbestos-contaminated cruise ship for the income it provides, in spite of heath and safety hazards.

[13]

“Dilovasi, symbol of savage industrialization”
Agence France-Presse, November 7, 2006

Dilovasi, a Turkish industrial city of 500,000, has a 30 percent mortality rate from cancer. Turkey says it will take $44.5 billion to clean up its industries.

[14]

“Kabwe in Zambia, Africa’s most toxic city”
Integrated Regional Information Networks (U.N.), November 9, 2006

Children in Africais biggest lead-producing city still play in the dust of a defunct smelter while their mothers mine the refuse with their fingers.


Editor: Julia Scott | Intern: Scott Domini Ehlert

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